CATEGORIES: Gearing-Up

Fujifilm X-Pro 2 Review after 12 Months of Wedding Photography

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Dennis Adams

Great usage comments and observations. Definitely will help me as an amateur and Fuji enthusiast. One question on noise reduction. Do you apply a -4 setting to all of your film sims or just to Acros

Matt Bunting

Hi Dennis, glad to help! I apply -4 noise reduction on all of my JPEG in-camera profiles. This will mean that the camera is doing the least amount of noise reduction so while your pictures will be more grainy they’ll look less “plastic”
Matt

Mikko Kankainen

Hi!
I just had to write because your story is a lot like mine. I bought X-Pro2 for wedding work when it was published. It’s a perfect wedding camera but now thanks to voice memo also great for reportage. Events, even video work sometimes..

I love the look of your images and that you know how to use bigger f-numbers, great job indeed! 🙂
I also love acros but mostly I use Astia for weddings, but after reading your thoughts I must try CC more.

I disagree only one thing. I love my X-Pro1 and still use it almost as much as Pro2, there is something magic about it and the files it produces. For a pro I could recommend it. Actually it’s sitting right next to me on the kitchen table when I’m writing this 🙂

Matt Bunting

Hi there Mikko!
Thanks for taking a look, it’s interesting to hear your thoughts and I’m glad you’re enjoying both your X Pro 1 and 2 – I think the X Pro 1 for some falls into the same category as the X100T when it comes to that certain degree of Fuji-magic it has and there’s something to be said for the quality of the gear based on how connected to their cameras many Fuji users become.
Cheers
Matt

john canavan

Excellent review Matt good quality article but honest, i use the x series xpro 2 xt2 and xpro 1 , i would like a 100f but i think i would if i had the money bypass it and get an xt20 body as the AF is much quicker and for street work and weddings its a great help.
Zone focusing is fine if you have time etc but when i need a fast focus i would rather the xt20 than the 100f and its small plus one can change the lens if needed?
More power to you and i am now going to have a look at some of your portfolio .
Thanks again John

Matt Bunting

Hi John,
Thanks for taking the time to read my review. The XT20 is for sure a great camera and I actually think it would be a very solid camera choice for many photographers. It strikes a brilliant balance between price and performance. I love working with the rangefinder design of the XPro and x100 series so I’d be unlikely to move back over to the T series in the near future, but it’s no doubt the XT20 is a great option.
Cheers
Matt

Flo

very nice review and i like your photos a lot!

Matt Bunting

Thanks very much for taking the time to have a read!
Cheers
Matt

Russell DeRose

Thanks Matt for the wonderful review. While not a professional photographer, I appreciate the quality and style of the XPro2, even as an amatuer. It is also good to hear a positive review about the camera which seems to have been forgotten once the XT2 hit the streets.
Russell

Matt Bunting

Hi Russell
Thanks for taking the time to read and comment. I too wonder if the XT2 stole the limelight when it was released, the XPro2 has an avid following for sure but I think perhaps it appeals to a more niche market.
Cheers
Matt

Stephen Bourne

Hi Matt
Very well written review. I like you’re writing style. Your descriptions are really good. “A wheel within a wheel” when describing the ISO dial, understandably descriptive for someone coming from old semi manual SLR’s. Canon AE1 for me, back in the 1980’s. My Canon journey has lasted since then until falling in love with a X100s a few years ago.
I have been shooting a few weddings and portraits (newborn babies included, which are hard work) and still rely mainly on my Canon gear for this. I did though, acquire an XT1 which is my now, go to camera for travel and walk around stuff.
I’m now contemplating on moving completely over to Fuji but can’t justify (at present) the lack of flash options for Fuji cameras, especially off camera.This also presents the next problem, lens acquisition. Fuji glass is amazing but also expensive, I am completely jealous that my brother has just purchased an XT2 with a few lenses and hasn’t got a clue! As you are well aware, keeping two camera systems maintained is financially difficult. Dilemmas, dilemmas!
Once again, great review.
Steve

Matt Bunting

Thanks for your comment Steve and many apologies, I’ve only just noticed that this was pending approval.
Given that your comment was over a month ago, you may well have progressed your decisions dilemmas further by now, but I would agree that the Fuji flash options are without a doubt limited at the moment and a definite drawback for certain types of photography / photographer.
As far as lenses go, I’d agree that it can be very expensive running two systems simultaneously. The beauty I’ve found with Fuji is that I’ve actually only owned 5 different Fujifilm lenses, of which I only currently have 3 – although they’re pricey, all 3 act really well together as a package and I rarely find myself wanting anything else.
I’ll be interested to know if and when you decide to go full Fuji or stick with Canon!
Thanks
Matt

Hi Matt
I’ve recently moved to the xpro2 and my first couple of shoots was a bit disappointing, I think the problem is my metering setting being “matrix” which meter setting do you use yourself for weddings?
Love your images and hope you can help me to emulate them.

Darren

Matt Bunting

Hi Darren,
Thanks for taking the time to read and for your kind words about my photographs. My metering mode is also on matrix/multi. Depending on what didn’t work out so well for you on the shoot if it’s exposure related I generally use my exposure compensation dial combined with my aperture ring to create the desired effect, with SS and ISO left to Auto (within some predetermined confines, for example, SS never to go slower than 1/125). That way, although the camera is still using most of the scene to meter I’m ultimately making the decision as to how bright or dark the scene is going to be.
Feel free to email me a photograph to look at (info@novelfocusphotography.com) though and I’d be more than happy to see if I can help!
Cheers
Matt

Great photos. What flash would you recommend for weddings and events.

Matt Bunting

Hi Darren,
Thanks very much! It really depends on how much control you need over the flash. I personally still use the EF-X20 on a TTL cable for the vast majority of my flash work, but this tends to be limited to the dancefloor photographs where I can zone focus and drag the shutter. I don’t tend to use flash for portraits, or that kind of work so I don’t tend to need wireless triggers or a huge amount of power. If that’s the path you’re going down though then I’d say that the EF-X20 probably isn’t the one for you. Godox seem to have a solid reputation on some of the Fujifilm wedding photography groups I’m part of, so I’d consider looking at them.

I’d say as well, depending on what you need I’ve often found a video light is a useful bit of kit to have around. So my favourite latest toy is the Lumecube, which is a tiny LED light that can throw out a decent amount of light. It’s great for if I get grabbed in the evening to do a shot of two or three guests I’ll take that out of my pocket and shine it on them for some quick, easy light.

I hope this helps
Cheers
Matt

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